1967 Toronado Fuel Tank

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Doc Hubler
Posts: 359
Joined: Thu Sep 27, 2012 9:37 pm
TOA Membership Number: 992
Years Owned: 1967

Re: 1967 Toronado Fuel Tank

Postby Doc Hubler » Tue Jul 19, 2016 7:53 am

Having been through this on my car, it's not easy. Yes, you can find one (John Dorcey may be a good source). But how much rust, etc will the tank have that needs to be repaired? Ok, not so hard, you can just hot tank the fuel tank and clean it up, check for leaks. The 66-67 Toros have a fuel sock on the pick-up tube of the tank. These may or may not be good, but chances are not good if you had a bunch of varnish in the tank. Replacing them is difficult, and filter's themselves are hard to find. The best course then is to probably just remove the filter sock altogether and install a good inline fuel filter (recommended in either case). You may also have difficulty finding a good fuel sender if yours is no longer working correctly. If you need pictures of any of this let me know. Been there done that -- had to repair damage to the tank when someone tried to lift the car using the tank as a lift point. Thankfully mine had little corrosion or varnish at all inside. The fuel sender was toast. I found a NOS one from a 67 Eldorado that is virtually the same (may actually be just new, $80). The Service Manual suggests that if you can't blow the obstruction out of the filter sock by removing tank and pressurizing with air the other way, replace the tank. Apparently the original filter sock collar may have been welded onto the pickup tube. They are difficult to remove. I'm sure that brought a lot of grumbling from customers and service depts. Olds changes the entire sender unit and combined it with the filter element in 1968 and it all comes out in one piece. You can't substitute one for the other though. Completely different design. You're stuck with 66-67 fuel tanks and there are no reproductions.

Otto Skorzeny
Posts: 1130
Joined: Fri Feb 28, 2014 12:41 pm
TOA Membership Number: 0
Years Owned: 1966 Toronado

Re: 1967 Toronado Fuel Tank

Postby Otto Skorzeny » Tue Jul 19, 2016 9:18 am

I have had good service from the fuel tank sloshing compound sold by Eastwood. My dad did my mom's 1964 Galaxie 500 tank in 2000 and it's been perfect ever since. There was a pinhole leak that has not leaked a drop after the tank was done.

My '56 Cadillac was done in 2007 or so and it's fine, too.

Basically you clean the tank thoroughly, add the sloshing compound, and rotate the tank so that the entire inside is coated with the sloshing compound. When it's dry, you have a leakproof membrane coating the entire inside of the tank.

Of course the sending unit must be removed.

http://www.eastwood.com/por-15-fuel-tan ... r-kit.html

There were several bad reviews of this product but this guy wrote a very detailed account of his successful use of the product. It mirrors my experience with the Galaxie. Cleanliness is next to Godliness when recoating a fuel tank to achieve perfect results. I suspect the bad reviews were from folks who didn't have the patience to clean and dry the tank properly.


One of the best sealers if you do it correctly

On of the best sealers that I have used for gas tanks in 30 years. Prep is VERY particular and you MUST keep everything clean and DRY after the steps. I have never had a kit go bad once in the cleaned tank and cured properly. The process is very laborious and you need to be patient but the rewards are excellent.

Be certain to have a large sink accessible, several flashlights (LEDs are great) warm clean distilled water to rinse, a hair dryer, 4 to 5 pair of clean nitrile gloves, isopropyl alcohol or acetone, and lots of clean rags/paper towels. Keep everything spotless while you are doing this.

If you have an external paint job protect it with adhesive film. Rinse the tank properly and take your time in the process. Dilute properly and don't rush the job. If you contaminate the tank with grease from hands, dirty towels or water....it will not adhere. Likewise you need to completely dry the tank with a hair drier and this may take 30+ minutes of purging to get it completely dry and you may have to let it sit overnight before you do POR which is what I did.

Change gloves frequently....dirty gloves still protect your hands but NOT the surfaces that the POR is going to bond too!! Be CLEAN!!! The entire tank needs to be rotated while drying to ensure all the water comes out and evaporates. I like to rinse my tank with distilled water from the store in lieu of tap water to ensure no deposits from well or tap water remain after (calcium, manganese, iron, etc.). You can also use 70% or 90% rubbing alcohol or acetone splashed in after the distilled water rinse to help dry out the tank.

Alcohol will not bother the paint but acetone may - so figure out what is best for your situation. Just remember to think before you blow dry....those solvents are flammable!! Give them time to evaporate out of the tank prior to heating it and keep it ventilated by doing it outside.

The entire tank should be nice and warm and everything dry. Keep the tank moving and inspect the inside with a flashlight every 5 minutes or so. Pay attention to the seams of the tank....water collects there and is very hard to get out. If water comes out during coating IT WILL BLISTER Likewise, when you etch and remove any rust....if there is still rust on the tank...IT WILL BLISTER!! Either will not allow the POR to adhere properly.

Buy extra degreaser and metal etch if you need to. I had a gallon and a quart in the 2 gallon tank to etch it and rotated it every 15 minutes Once the tank is dry warm the seams specifically with the hair dryer. Be patient and heat it well....and then do it again for good measure. My slightly rusty 250 Kawa tank took nearly 8 hours with degreasing, rinsing, etching and heating to dry it out. That did not include the over night dry prior to POR being applied.

Again...BE PATIENT and plan for a whole day +. Once you are completely dry then add the POR and slowly rotate the tank to evenly and completely coat the entire inside of the tank. I taped off the areas that will take a gasket during reassembly to ensure there was a clean metal surface. Chase the threads when done also.

That said once it hardened it was beautiful and is much more resistant to additives and ethanol than the "white" coating kits. Tanks look beautiful inside and my motorcycle shop asked what brand my tank sealer was...and they started ordering and using this on their tanks. It is a good product but will take some patience....and extra etch and degreaser to ensure it is cleaned and etched properly.



If all that sounds like something you want to avoid, call this company. They offer a lifetime guarantee on all repaired tanks. http://gastankrenu.com/

Otto Skorzeny
Posts: 1130
Joined: Fri Feb 28, 2014 12:41 pm
TOA Membership Number: 0
Years Owned: 1966 Toronado

Re: 1967 Toronado Fuel Tank

Postby Otto Skorzeny » Tue Jul 19, 2016 9:49 am

If all that sounds like something you want to avoid, call this company. They offer a lifetime guarantee on all repaired tanks.

http://gastankrenu.com/

Otto Skorzeny
Posts: 1130
Joined: Fri Feb 28, 2014 12:41 pm
TOA Membership Number: 0
Years Owned: 1966 Toronado

Re: 1967 Toronado Fuel Tank

Postby Otto Skorzeny » Sat Jul 30, 2016 5:46 am

Tell him I said, hi!


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